MP Special Project - Channeled Scablands, Washington


These slides were taken with a Nikon N90 camera supported on a tripod and Fujichrome Velvia film. The landscapes were photographed in early May several years ago during mid- to late-afternoon light. Please note that the scanned JPEG images on this page lack the sharpness and color tones of the original slides. It is recommended that they be used for evaluating the composition and layout of the book cover. Please contact me (925) 424-5063 if you have any questions.

ID 23
Dry Falls State Park, Washington
This scene highlights the large basaltic boulders in the foreground and distal background, which hint at the energy of these cataclysmic glacial floods. The late afternoon shadows add depth to the foreground boulders. 

ID 37
Dry Falls State Park, Washington
This scene highlights the large plunge pools at the base of  the 300 to 400 foot cliffs. Although present in the foreground, the basaltic boulders are more subtle than in the previous photograph.

ID2190
Dry Falls State Park, Washington
Accumulation of large basaltic boulders downstream of plunge pools at Dry Falls State Park. Dry Falls is a great cataract 3.3 miles wide and 396 feet high that formed during the cataclysmic late Pleistocene floods emanating from glacial Lake Missoula in Montana. The origin of the Channeled Scablands was the subject of one of the most famous controversies in the history of geology. When J. Harlen Bretz formulated the cataclysmic flood hypothesis in 1923, his ideas were rejected. Nearly 50 years passed before his ideas became a standard of geologic thinking. In 1979 and at nearly 90 years of age he was awarded the Penrose Medal of the Geological Society of America, the nation's highest geological award.

ID 2
Dry Falls State Park, Washington
This scene highlights the large plunge pools at the base of  the 300 to 400 foot cliffs. Although present in the foreground, the basaltic boulders are more subtle than in other photographs.

ID 9
Dry Falls State Park, Washington
This scene highlights the large plunge pools at the base of  the 300 to 400 foot cliffs.

ID 33
Lake Lenoore Caves, Washington
Lake Lenoore Caves were formed during the last Ice Age, when the glacial floods eroded coulees. Native Americans began using these caves for shelters at least 5,000 years ago. Lake Lenoore Caves are located about 5 miles north of Soda Lake along highway 17.

Please note that the silhouette of the cave is completely black in the original slide.


ID 35
Dry Falls State Park, Washington
This scene highlights the large plunge pools at the base of  the 300 to 400 foot cliffs and the stratification of the Columbia River Plateau basalts.

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